Stack: Leading Through Story

This stack was created by PaulSmith almost 2 years ago.


1 — People are more effective at their job when they work with people they trust. People trust the ones they know personally. Get to know your coworkers personally, and they’ll trust you. You’ll all work more effectively.
 

We don’t tell our personal stories because we work with strangers. They remain strangers because we don’t tell our personal stories. Challenge people to tell their stories, and you’ll never work with strangers again.
One of the most effective team-building activities is also the simplest. Have people sit in a circle and tell stories about themselves. The best will be ones that create vulnerability by showing an insecurity or describing a painful time in life—exactly the kind of stories people don’t like to tell strangers in the office. And that’s the point. You have to break the cycle.

Taken from: Lead With A Story: A Guide To Crafting Business Narratives That Captivate, Convince, And Inspire, By Paul Smith

Block created by PaulSmith almost 2 years ago


2 — In business, the competitor that understands the customer best will earn more of her loyalty. Understanding your customer involves more than a demographic profile. And for that you’ll need a story.
 

If the only customer information used in your organization resides in dry PowerPoint presentations and in reams of statistical data, the people you work with probably don’t understand your customer any more than you understand your own medical charts
In 1985, Jim was a researcher working on the Crisco shortening brand. He was interviewing a woman about why she preferred to cook with lard instead of Crisco. She said, “I know Crisco is healthier. But it’s better for my kids if I use lard.” Confused, Jim asked, “how can lard be better for your kids if Crisco is healthier?” The woman explained, “If I buy Crisco, I can’t afford milk. Lard and milk is healthier than shortening and water. So I buy lard . . . and milk.” That comment hit Jim hard. For the first time he really understood the difficult choices a struggling single mom had to make to afford his product. Repeating her story back at the office gave others far more insight to her plight than a stack of statistical research data. Stories define people, not statistics.

Taken from: Lead With A Story: A Guide To Crafting Business Narratives That Captivate, Convince, And Inspire, By Paul Smith

Block created by PaulSmith almost 2 years ago


3 — Recognizing you’re in a situation where a story needs to be told is step one. But if you don’t have the right story to tell, the moment is lost. And that’s usually what happens.
 

The single biggest barrier most leaders have to using stories is that they just don’t have any stories to tell. Don’t wait. Start collecting them now. Here are some places to look . . .
Don’t wait until you need a good story to look for one. Here are some places to look: 1) your own past (your biggest successes, failures, surprises, disappointments, creative inspirations); 2) as they happen around you (especially when someone learns an unexpected lesson—make a story out of it); 3) stories you hear from other people (if you liked it, retell it!); 4) great stories you read in books, magazines, newspapers, etc.

Taken from: Lead With A Story: A Guide To Crafting Business Narratives That Captivate, Convince, And Inspire, By Paul Smith

Block created by PaulSmith almost 2 years ago


4 — Having a villain not only makes your stories more interesting and memorable, but often is the source of the key lesson you’re trying to teach.
 

Stories without a villain won’t help anyone. Their heroes didn’t overcome any adversity. They didn’t confront any challenge. In short, they got lucky. Telling a story about how you got lucky is no way to lead.
The villain is commonly excluded in business stories. The result is a boring, useless story. It’s typified by tales of the office braggart: “After I came to this department five years ago sales started to skyrocket and profits doubled! Stick with me kid and you’ll go places.” Like this one, stories without a villain won’t help anyone. They didn’t learn anything valuable.

Taken from: Lead With A Story: A Guide To Crafting Business Narratives That Captivate, Convince, And Inspire, By Paul Smith

Block created by PaulSmith almost 2 years ago


5 — Since stories typically only reside in the minds of your employees, every time one of them quits or retires, or just forgets, that story is lost forever.
 

Just about everything that can be databased in a modern business is, except for the richest source of wisdom in any company—its stories. Write your stories down so you’ll have access to them when you need them.
In every modern business, just about everything that can be written down is saved in a computer somewhere—sales data, payroll information, inventory levels, policy memos, production schedules, etc. Everything, that is, except for the richest source of wisdom in any company—its stories. Those are left to the frailties of human memory and the inevitability of attrition. Write your stories down. Save them in a way you can search for them by title or subject. You’ll always have access to them when you need them.

Taken from: Lead With A Story: A Guide To Crafting Business Narratives That Captivate, Convince, And Inspire, By Paul Smith

Block created by PaulSmith almost 2 years ago




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